Pagina's

zondag 16 november 2014

Where the friars lie to rest...

Recently I noticed a lot of people upgrading to Fuji's latest models and lenses. The X-T1 and the 56mm f/1.2 to name a few examples. While I can understand the need to have the latest model and being a huge Fuji fan myself I do not follow that trend. Still being very pleased with my "old" X-E1 I decided to buy a second one for a very low price. That little machine performs as a charm and suits all my needs and now I have two of them :)

Anyhow, yesterday I visited a cemetary situated or should I say hidden in the forest behind a school. That school is the Sint-Jozefinstituut in Bokrijk, near Genk, and had during the years various destinations. From Kneipp-instituut to sanatorium for lung diseases to school which it still is. In the early days the teachers were friars and a lot of them found their last resting place here in this little cemetary...

All pictures were shot with the Fuji X-E1 coupled with the Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 and shot @ f/1.4. All shots are each the result of at least 10 photographs and stitched together since the angle of the 35mm is not that large...







donderdag 13 november 2014

Baraque Michel...

After seeing images of a fellow photographer I decided to visit the same place he did, the Baraque Michel.
The Baraque Michel is with its 674m altitude the second highest place in Belgium. Not very high you will tell me but you have to know that Belgium is not well known for its mountainranges. The name Baraque Michel should have as origin "the house of Michel" as a certain Michel-Henri Schmitz founded an inn on this place. The inn I didn't visit since it has been very modernised but the nature here, called The High Fens, is still very big and untouched and has been declared a natural reserve in 1957.
I was quite lucky as this morning the fog was still present, creating a more atmospheric mood.


All the pictures have been taken with the Fuji X-E1 and either the 18-55mm or the 35mm. The 35mm has been used to take the images with the Brenizer technique, a technique I love to make details come out.
Anyhow, now on to the pictures...







maandag 10 november 2014

Searching for light in the darkness...

This weekend was spent in Liège, a place I visit frequently. My kit was limited to the Fuji X-E1 and the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 in order to challenge myself with minimalistic gear.
I ended up in the Cathédrale Saint-Paul de Liège, that was built in the 10th century and recieving the status of cathedral in the 19th century.
The light was great that day, shining through the cathedral's windows and being helped with a fast lens I got some nice looking shots....









woensdag 5 november 2014

Fuji X-E1 and the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 on the "Brenizer way"...

The Brenizer-method is a well known technique in order to produce a wide angle image with a very limited DOF. This technique is already well documented on the Internet but the basic of this is taking a certain amount of images of your subject and surroundings with a lens set at its widest aperture. Afterwards all these images are stitched together....

Although it is recommended to use longer focals (85mm and further) I wanted to try this out with the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4.

I learned 2 things today; I took way to many pictures and I must be closer to my subject next time to have more extreme DOF effect...But I'm still pleased with my results :)




zondag 2 november 2014

Left to rot and desintegrate...

I went to France a few weeks ago, in first instance to photograph decaying naval ships awaiting their final destination cfr the scrapyard. See my previous post " Final destination" for this : http://am-fotografie.blogspot.be/2014/10/final-destination.html

But France has more to offer of course and has also a few ship cemetaries where ships are left to rot and desintegrate. A lust for the photographic eye if you are into decay, water and clouds...

Anyhow, being there I visited 3 such cemetaries : Le Fret, Rostellec and Camaret-sur-mer. In Le Fret only a few carcasses, in Camaret-sur-mer the ships a placed in such a place to be considered as a touristic attraction and then we have Rostellec that is the most photogenic place of the 3 with the biggest choice of decay. As I later saw, it was forbidden to go near the wrecks ... but my French isn't that good so I didn't understand the sign ;)

For the more adventurous "infiltration" of the Navy ships I opted for my Fuji X-E1 coupled with only the 18-55mm kitlens and my choice was just the same here, my Nikon D600 remaining in the car as merely backup camera...as it often does or not to say always these days.

So much for the little story, now on to the pictures...

Rostellec





Le Fret



Camaret-sur-mer


donderdag 30 oktober 2014

Final destination ...

Somewhere in France, safely anchored from the ocean in a roadsted, these ships are awaiting their final destination...the scrapyard.  To access these rusted beauties the use of an inflatable boat and very light photographic gear was inevitable. So I opted for my fuji X-E1 and the 18-55 kitlens...
Anyhow, we had a lot of fun getting there and getting on board besides a few nice pictures too !

The largest vessel is the French cruiser Colbert, serving the French Navy from 1956 till 1991 and was then converted into a museumship. Since 2007 it awaits scrapping...

Yours truly en route to board these vessels...









A final view of these rusted beauties, ready for their final destination...


maandag 15 september 2014

On the verge of destruction...

In Germany, just across the Belgian and Dutch border lies the region Nordrhein-Westfalen, ...



That particular region is very known for its mining industry of brown coal, a proces that happens above the ground. Once the coal layer has been scraped away the mine has to expand. The villages that are in that expansionzone are being completely bought up and the villagers are "umgesiedelt" or resettled. And the houses? They become ghosttowns that will be completely destroyed within a few years. It is one of those villages, on the verge of destruction, that I visited recently. Perhaps 20 houses remained, dispersed in 4 or 5 streets...





Sad but true, these parts of history have to disappear for the benefit of industry....